About

Reading with DaddyOnce upon a time there was a little girl named Theresa whose mother cut her bangs cruelly short. Theresa loved books. She especially loved her daddy reading them to her, but it wasn’t long before she was reading books on her own. Then one BIG day, the clouds parted, lightning struck, and Theresa realized she could make her own books. Appropriating her mother’s Royal typewriter, she began to write a series of “Joey Stories,” featuring her rascal brother who did bad things and got into trouble. Naturally his older, wiser sister Theresa was the only one who could rescue him. It was a case of art imitating life, and Theresa was hooked.

At 14As Theresa grew up into the adult world, she realized that people were nuts. No sooner had she finagled her first rite-of-passage bra, when women everywhere began burning theirs! Protesters picketed, Lucy floated in the sky with diamonds, and Theresa was voted the zaniest member of her 8th grade class even though she was the only sane member of the bunch.

Much to her mother’s surprise, Theresa survived adolescence, eventually finding her way to UCLA and the study of European History, a major which involved the acquisition of many (expensive) books. Unfortunately, Theresa soon discovered that historians often do not make good writers. And, instead of studying hairstyles in Elizabethan England, Theresa was subjected to long boring lectures on open field farming during the middle ages.

Escaping academia without looking back, she found a job in public broadcasting, and become a card carrying member of the Directors Guild of America–but she gets ahead of herself here. Working alongside Big Bird and Elmo, she somehow found time to get married and have two children whose bangs she never cut too short and who loved it when she read stories to them.

Now that they are old enough to tell her what to do most of the time (and be right about it), Theresa is once again indulging her love of story. She is finishing up her first young adult novel, a fantasy set in Los Angeles.

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